Is Your Child Being Bullied? 
A child is bullied or victimized when he or she is exposed, repeatedly and over time, to negative actions on the part of one or more other students. Children often will not tell their parents that they are being victimized. 

Warning Signs: 
  •  Comes home from school with torn, damaged, or missing clothing, books, and belongings. 
  •  Has unexplained bruises, injuries, cuts, and scratches. 
  •  Does not bring classmates or other peers home after school and seldom spends time in the homes of classmates or peers. 
  •  Seems isolated from peers and may not have a good friend to share time with. 
  •  Appears to be fearful about attending school, walking to and from school, or riding the bus. 
  •  Has poor appetite, headaches, and stomach pains (particularly in the morning). 
  •  Chooses a longer, "illogical" route for going to and from school. 
  •  Asks for or takes extra money from family (money that may go to a bully). 
  •  Appears anxious, distressed, unhappy, depressed or tearful when he or she comes home from school. 
  •  Shows unexpected mood shifts, irritability, or sudden outbursts of temper. 
  •  Has sleeping or eating problems. 
  •  May lose interest in school work and experience a decline in academic performance. 
  •  Talks about or attempts suicide. 
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  •  Be supportive and show concern. Tell your child that the bulling is not his/her fault.
  •  Praise and encourage your child - a confident child is less likely to be bullied.
  •  Help your child learn to look assertive and confident by standing up straight, using a clear voice and making eye contact.
  • Suggest that your child stay away from the bully, avoiding unsupervised places where the bully hangs out.
  •  Encourage your child to participate in activities they enjoy to improve esteem and to develop friendships with new peers.
  •  Seek help from a mental health professional 
 Encourage your child to share his/her problems with you. Ensure him or her that this is not tattling.
 Know that your child may be embarrassed, ashamed, and fearful.
 Listen attentively and reassure him/her that he/she will not have to face the problem alone.
If your child is a victim of bullying:
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Children who bully typically have a need to feel powerful and in control.  Children who bully appear to have little anxiety and a strong self-esteem. They work through fear and manipulation, intimidating others by threatening to harm them or calling them names if the victim tells anybody what is occurring. Children who bully tend to become aggressive adults who stand a much higher chance than non-bullies of racking up multiple criminal convictions.

How to help the child that bullies:

  • Always maintain open lines of communication with your child. Talk to your child using open ended questions. Listen carefully without being judgmental.
  • Make sure your child isn't witnessing violence between members of your family. Sibling rivalry can lead to reactive bullying. Adults must treat each other with respect, dignity and without violence. Children model what they see not necessarily what they are told.
  • Talk to your child, his teachers and school administrators.
  • Work with your school to help your child. Ask for suggestions. This may include talking with your family doctor, social worker or psychologist. If the behavior continues a comprehensive evaluation may be  may be suggested to help uncover the root cause of the poor behavior.
  • Make it clear that bullying will not be tolerated at home or in school. Support your school in dealing with this problem.
  • Have your child walk in the victim's shoes. Many children bully because they lack the empathy to see the pain they cause.
  • Increase your supervision of your child's activities and whereabouts. Encourage group organized activities.
  • Praise the efforts your child makes toward becoming nonviolent and responsible.
This information was taken from a variety of Bullying Prevention websites  See resources for more information on Bullying Prevention.
Stand UP! Speak OUT! of Catawba Valley is a registered 501(c)3 organization, and all contributions are tax-deductible to the extent allowed by law.

© Copyright 2012 - 2013 Stand UP Speak OUT Catawba Valley/ P.O. Box 2222 Hickory, NC 28603 / 828-320-1937

email: info@standupspeakoutcv.org
Websites we recommend:
Get KnowBullying, the free app from SAMHSA that can prevent bullying.
Stand UP! Speak OUT! of Catawba Valley is a registered 501(c)3 organization, and all contributions are tax-deductible to the extent allowed by law.
© Copyright 2012 - 2014 Stand UP Speak OUT Catawba Valley/ P.O. Box 2222 Hickory, NC 28603 / 828-320-1937
email: info@standupspeakoutcv.org
Teens talk about what they want from adults when they witness or experience bullying.

Tips for working with your child’s school 
if he or she is being bullied:​
Why This Matters. An Advocate's Perspective